President Mike Fitts stands at his desk

June 1, 2017

With the joyful strains of Commencement 2017 still ringing in our ears, it is time to celebrate the tremendous success of the 2016–17 academic year. The following pages offer a look back at this amazing period of growth and research breakthroughs.

From the exciting expansion and renovation of buildings such as the A. B. Freeman School of Business and Mussafer Hall, to the continued rise of Tulane in national rankings, to the $160 million in research funding our faculty attracted, it was a spectacular year.

We highlight students who are engaged in research that combines disciplines as diverse as political science and public health, scholar-athletes who knock both the ball and the MCAT out of the park, and math majors who help write their own textbooks.

You will also meet a dean who is using virtual reality to help those fighting addiction, learn more about a new history professor who is also a best-selling biographer, and visit with alumni who are changing the world through news, politics, technology, medicine and literature.

From threatened coastlines and cultures in Louisiana, to global poverty, to outer space, Tulane is bringing the brightest minds together to meet the greatest challenges of our times.

This is our story. This is the power of Tulane…   Mike Fitts signature

 

WE'VE BEEN BUSY
TOP
PRODUCER OF
Fulbright
—Grant—
WINNERS
2017
U.S. News
and World
Report
Ranking
NO.
39
$160
MILLION
in
Research
Grants
vs.
$122 million
from the previous year
TOTAL
2017
GRADUATES
2,760
460,000
HOURS
OF TULANE COMMUNITY SERVICE
 
2016-2017
Enrollment
8,452
UNDER-
GRADUATES
GRADUATE +
PROFESSIONAL
STUDENTS

5,129
#1
producer of
Peace Corps
volunteers
AMONG GRAD
SCHOOLS
CLASS OF
2020
159
FINISHED HIGH
SCHOOL WITH A
4.0
Average SAT score
20
points higher
than previous year
Applications Increased
by
22%
New @
TU
MUSSAFER HALL
CONSTRUCTION
AND RENOVATION
THE SCHOOL OF
PROFESSIONAL
ADVANCEMENT
(SoPA),
formerly known as
the School of Continuing
Studies, has a NEW NAME
and a NEW DIRECTION
A new PhD PROGRAM
in COMPUTER SCIENCE
85,000
SQUARE FEET

of new and renovated space at A. B. Freeman School of Business

WHO WE ARE

At Tulane, we don't stand down, we stand out. The strong connection between our students and faculty encourage the pursuit of individual passions that results in the ideas and solutions our world needs most.

TULANE EMPOWERS STUDENTS TO BREAK BARRIERS…

Portrait of Asis Lopez
"This year, my colleagues and I are investigating ultrasound as a form of therapy to regenerate neurons for spinal cord injuries. In addition, we are researching bubble dynamics in blood vessels through high-intensity ultrasound and, in parallel, developing a computational model for blood vessel rupture.”"

AND INSPIRE THOSE AROUND US

Profile picture of Alyssa Cruse
"I’ve worked in the Cognitive Neuroscience Labs since my sophomore year, studying the effects of musical experience and training on spatial selective attention, which is our ability to orient or react to specific images or sounds. My research has been one of the highlights of my time at Tulane. It has made me more confident in my basic communication and teaching skills—assets invaluable to a hopeful physician.”"

TO ACHIEVE BALANCE IN LIFE…

Hunter Williams swinging a baseball bat during a game
"As a student-athlete, Tulane is perfect because it has excellence in academics and athletics. This balance is especially tough for athletes— taking the grind from the classroom to the field. Tulane has taught me how to effectively manage my time while allowing me to practice with my brothers every day—I don’t think I’d be as happy anywhere else.”"

AND FIND CURES

Jessica Conrad studying in a class room.
"My work has centered around mathematic epidemiology—I produce math models to understand the transmission dynamics and behavior changes related to the spread of diseases such as Ebola and Chagas. At Tulane, I’ve learned the impact of public health is beyond what we can see, and the possibilities are endless. My trajectory has changed from wanting to save one life at a time, to hopefully helping thousands.”"

WE ARE INNOVATIVE THINKERS

Patrick Bordnick

Portrait of Patrick Bordnick
DEAN, SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
Virtual reality may help people beat addiction, says Dean Patrick Bordnick, who joined Tulane in 2016. He believes smartphones can bridge the gap between the clinic and the real world. His trailblazing research shows that a simple cellphone app can help patients sharpen their decision-making skills in times of crisis.

Maureen Lichtveld

Portrait of Maureen Lichtveld sitting on her desk
PROFESSOR AND CHAIR, SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND TROPICAL MEDICINE
Maureen Lichtveld’s ongoing research on environmentally induced diseases launched her into the national spotlight when she was elected to the prestigious National Academy of Medicine this past year. This is one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine—based on scholarly accomplishments, leadership and vision. Lichtveld’s storied career in environmental public health spans more than 30 years.

Walter Isaacson

Portrait of Walter Isaacson sitting on park bench
DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR OF HISTORY, SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Best-selling author and public intellectual Walter Isaacson this year agreed to join the history department. Isaacson penned biographies of Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein and Benjamin Franklin, and is a former chairman and CEO of CNN, managing editor of TIME, and leader of the Aspen Institute.

Patrick Button

Portrait of Patrick Button
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF ECONOMICS, SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
Older may be wiser, but that doesn’t always matter for female job applicants. Patrick Button, who studies discrimination in the labor market, co-authored a study this year that shows age bias in the workforce is stronger against older women. Among his findings was a negative contrast in callbacks for administrative positions for women ages 49–51 and 64–66, who were offered job interviews at a 47 percent lower rate than younger women, ages 29–31.

Shawn Rickenbacker

Portrait of Shawn Rickenbacker
TAYLOR SENIOR FELLOW FOR 2016-17 AND FAVROT VISITING CHAIR, SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Humans and machines: friends, enemies, masters and servants? This year, Rickenbacker pushed students to think harder about the artificial intelligence that creates relationships with machines, and how it informs design and environmental issues.

WE ARE CULTIVATING TOP SCHOLARS


Tulane was designated as a FULBRIGHT top producing institution for the 2016–17 academic year. Over the past two grant cycles, 26 students and alumni received awards to conduct research, teach English or pursue graduate study in the following countries:

A. B. FREEMAN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
  • Taylor Geiger, Slovak Republic
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS AND
A. B. FREEMAN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
  • Nathan Benjamin, Mexico
SCHOOL OF MEDICINE AND
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND
TROPICAL MEDICINE
  • Kelly Jensen, Peru
  • Brady Page, Brazil
SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
  • Kelsey Lacourrege, Austria
  • Christian Nguyen, Spain
  • Gabriel Rodriguez, Italy
SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS
  • Jennie Barker, Germany
  • Vanessa Castaneda, Brazil
  • David Chatelain, Guatemala
  • Jaclyn Cole, Mexico
  • Hannah Dean, Colombia
  • Claire Dockery, Germany
  • Samuel Fishman, Paraguay
  • Leah Fox, Spain
  • Abigail Goodman, Taiwan
  • Louise Gretschel, Turkey*
  • Sarah Haensly, Mexico
  • Alexa Haverlah, Mexico
  • Allison Koh, Malaysia
  • Jesus Ruiz, Spain
  • Peyton Smith, Turkey*
  • Bria Trosclair, Bulgaria
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND TROPICAL MEDICINE
  • Kayla Bruce, Uganda
  • Hannah Kaufman, Paraguay
  • Jessica Tran, Vietnam

 

*suspended programs

THE TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP, one of the most prestigious national scholarships in the U.S., supports the next generation of public service leaders. Winners are selected based on their outstanding record of leadership, public service and academic achievement.

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS

_________

THE GOLDWATER SCHOLARSHIP is awarded to college sophomores and juniors who intend to pursue research careers in the natural sciences, mathematics and engineering.

SCHOOL OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

_________

THE BEINECKE SCHOLARSHIP is granted to highly motivated college juniors who plan to pursue graduate study in the arts, humanities and social sciences.

SCHOOL OF LIBERAL ARTS

 

WHERE WE DO IT

At Tulane, the bond between our university and our city is the source of our strength. We proudly embody the spirit of New Orleans—our unique culture, groundbreaking research and passion for service allow us to make a difference around the world.

IN FRAGILE WETLANDS

Freighting on the Mississippi river
 
Parts of Louisiana’s coastline are drowning. In the westernmost part of the state, more than 60 percent of coastal sites may fall to accelerated sea-level rise, said Tulane geology professor Torbjörn E. Törnqvist, who co-authored a study in 2017 in the journal Nature Communications. Drawing attention to rising sea levels helps arm scientists with the critical knowledge needed to address the growing global problem.

ON THE MIGHTY MISSISSIPPI

Freighting on the Mississippi river
 
Tasked with protecting our coast and vital waterways, the ByWater Institute, launched this year, is dedicated to finding solutions for the biggest challenges facing our region. Researchers use the high-tech Tulane River and Coastal Center located downtown on the Mississippi River to analyze soil sediment from the river, and will ultimately transport it to other sites to help preserve Louisiana’s wetlands. Watch a video about the ByWater Institute.

TULANIANS ARE MAKING A DIFFERENCE...

Mary Kathryn Nagle

Portrait of Mary Kathryn Nagle
LAW ’08
Mary Kathryn Nagle believes being a good storyteller is essential to both of her passions: law and playwriting. She is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation, and a partner at Pipestem Law, an Oklahoma-based firm specializing in sovereignty of native tribes and peoples. Her most recent work, Fairly Traceable, was produced in Los Angeles earlier this year and has a notable Tulane connection—one of the main characters is based on professor Oliver Houck.

Luis Guillermo Solís

Portrait of Luis Guillermo Solis receiving an award
GRADUATE SCHOOL ’81
As a student at Tulane, Luis Guillermo Solís was learning about political matters. It would be some time before he transitioned his career from academia to working in politics. Today, he serves as the president of Costa Rica. The alumnus and former Tulane professor was honored with two awards on a recent trip to campus: the President’s Medal and the Distinguished Alumni Award.

Peter Gold

Portrait of Peter Gold in his hospital scrubs
LIBERAL ARTS ’12,
MEDICINE ’16
Dr. Peter Gold isn’t done being a hero. The alumnus and Good Samaritan captured the world’s attention when he was shot rescuing a stranger being assaulted on a darkened street in November 2015. Now fully recovered and residing in New York, Gold and eight of his friends from Tulane have recently launched the Strong City foundation to help end cycles of violence within communities, starting with New Orleans. Watch a video featuring Gold.

Peggy Wang

Portrait of Peggy Wang
ENGINEERING ’01
Peggy Wang moved to New York City hoping to make it big in the music industry. She was the keyboardist and vocalist for the indie band The Pains of Being Pure at Heart, but now her day job is pretty cool, too: editorial director of life and lifestyle for BuzzFeed.com, a news website that attracts 7 billion views a month.

Steve Gleason

Portrait of Steve Gleason
BUSINESS ’11
Steve Gleason’s blocked punt is one of the most memorable Saints plays of all time, but it's his work with ALS patients that's made him known worldwide. Gleason says the lessons he learned at Tulane are helping him lead a foundation that finds new technologies for those diagnosed with ALS. This year the A. B. Freeman School of Business honored him as Outstanding Social Entrepreneur of the Year at the Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation Awards Gala.

HOW WE DO IT

We use the power of ideas to help tackle the world’s toughest challenges. Our research crosses disciplines, from the environment to experimental poetry, from the culture of the Gulf South to epidemics in Africa. Our scholars and researchers are committed to working together in order to understand and improve the human condition.

BY COMBINING OUR STRENGTHS

Artistic version of a skull x-ray
 
Researchers from the School of Science and Engineering and the School of Medicine are working against the clock to unlock the mysteries surrounding the aging of the brain. By studying the effects of unforgiving diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia, scientists and physicians at the newly minted Tulane Brain Institute are exploring the role of the brain in health and disease. Watch a video about the Brain Institute.

BY CROSSING BOUNDARIES

A team of students in workshop
 
A cross-disciplinary group of Tulane undergrads, including engineering, engineering physics, architecture and economics students, nabbed the top prize during NASA’s 2017 BIG Idea Challenge by beating teams from the top aerospace programs in the country. Stackable, hexagonal and solar-powered, their space ferry was the only submission of its kind—earning high praise from the judges with its “unanticipated design solution.” Members of the team earned internships at NASA headquarters. Watch a video about the Tulane NASA Challenge.

BY HONORING ACHIEVEMENT...

TEACHING AND
MENTORING AWARDS:

2017 WEISS FELLOWS

Elisabeth McMahon,
School of Liberal Arts

Beth Wee,
School of Science and Engineering

2017 PRESIDENT’S AWARDS
FOR GRADUATE AND
PROFESSIONAL TEACHING

Janet C. Hoeffel,
Tulane Law School

Victor Moll,
School of Science and Engineering

THE OLIVER FUND AWARD
FOR EXCELLENCE IN
FACULTY MENTORING

Dr. Jiang He,
School of Public Health
and Tropical Medicine

HONORARY DEGREES:

Helen Mirren,
Academy, Emmy and Tony
Award-winning actress

Branford Marsalis,
Grammy Award-winning
musician

Diane Nash,
Civil rights icon

Dr. Shelley Taylor,
Pioneering social
psychologist

MAY 20
—2017—

MERCEDES-BENZ
SUPERDOME

KEYNOTE
SPEAKER:
Helen Mirren

STUDENT
SPEAKER:
Corley A. Miller
School of Liberal Arts

 
 

 

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